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The majority of high-quality Panamanian coffee is produced in the province of Chiriquí, where the soil is uniquely enriched by Volcán Baru’s volcanic ash. Today you will have the opportunity to visit one of the area’s top working coffee plantations, where you will see the entire process from bean to cup and can even roast your own cup of Geisha Coffee!

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This special journey will bring you to a a local Embera village on the Chagres River for a unique peek into the lives of one of Panama’s 7 recognized indigenous tribes. The Embera people have populated the Choco region of western Colombia and the Darien region of eastern Panama for centuries, long before Spanish colonization. Today over 30,000 Embera inhabit Panama; while most still live in the Darien region, some communities have migrated to Chagres National Park between Panama City and Colon, allowing for more accessibility for tourism.

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Follow the famous route that thousands of cargo ships take each year on a full transit of the Panama Canal. This one-day canal crossing on a shared boat first crosses under the Bridge of the Americas and then navigates through all three sets of the Canal’s locks: the Pedro Miguel Locks, the Miraflores Locks and the Gatun Locks. On this journey from the Pacific to the Atlantic, you will also travel through the historically significant Gaillard Cut, otherwise known as the Culebra Cut, and discover Gatun Lake.

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This partial transit of the Panama Canal either follows a southbound or northbound route, depending on the day. On the partial transit, you will pass through two of the Canal’s three sets of locks: Miraflores Locks and Pedro Miguel Locks. The southbound route boards the shared boat in Gamboa and begins at the north end of the historically significant Gaillard Cut, also known as the Culebra Cut.

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In the morning, you will be picked up at your hotel for your one-hour car ride towards the city of Colon, located on the Atlantic coast of Panama. First you will stop at the San Lorenzo Fort, a castle and fortress built by the Spaniards in 1598 to protect the entrance to the Chagres River from pirate attacks. The Chagres River was a very important waterway for the transportation of gold and many other goods from ocean to ocean, eventually ending up in Europe. This fortress was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO In 1980.