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The Gulf of Chiriquí Marine Park is a protected area of nearly 58 square miles encompassing 25 islands and 19 coral reefs in the Gulf of Chiriquí, off of Panama’s Pacific Coast. This national park is home to unique coral reefs, marine swamps, and incredibly biodiverse marine ecosystems. Hammerhead sharks, Whitetip reef sharks, manta rays, dolphins, several species of sea turtles, schools of colorful fish, and other aquatic species are frequently seen here.

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Volcán Barú, a dormant volcano just south of the Continental Divide, is one of the only places in the world where it is possible to see both the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea at the same time with the naked eye. Dozens of people attempt the climb daily, hoping to make it to the summit before the gorgeous sunrise shines above the clouds, to then light up the mountain town of Boquete below.

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Today you will enjoy a full-day guided tour to Volcan, a magical place in the highlands, located at the foot of Baru Volcano. During this visit, you will stop at the beautiful Finca Drácula, an estate tucked into the edge of La Amistad Biosphere Reserve. It is known for its 2,200 species of orchids, including several extremely rare varieties, making it the largest collection in Latin America and one of the largest in the world. In addition to housing this impressive collection, the 22-acre finca promotes the education, investigation and conservation of orchids.

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Clip in and ascend the stairway to the first platform. Stop, look and listen. The island forest will come alive around you with the sounds and sights of nature. Launch from the first platform and feel the rush of adrenaline and freedom as you soar through the air. High up in the tree canopy, watch out for monkeys, birds and other exotic animals that may curiously watch and welcome you into their treetop homes.

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On this ecological tour, you will visit a privately owned and operated chocolate farm with botanical gardens. Walk through the lush tropical rainforest, botanical gardens and cacao plantation of the property’s 30 acres, while being introduced to the area’s flora and fauna. Howler monkeys, toucans, sloths, and a wide variety of birds and butterflies can often be seen here.

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Bocas Del Toro is one of the best spots for scuba diving in Panama, and its calm conditions, clear Caribbean waters and abundant aquatic biodiversity make it an ideal diving destination. The archipelago is part of La Amistad Biosphere Reserve, which is an international park spanning Panama and Costa Rica to protect the area’s rich ecosystems. Bocas Del Toro is also home to Isla Bastimentos National Marine Park, the country’s first national marine park.

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You will be taken to Playa El Arenal in Pedasí, where our boat will be waiting to take you to Iguana Island, a wildlife refuge 8 kilometers off the coast. The island is famous for its white sand beach, crystal waters, extensive mangrove forests and coral riffs, which include 12 different types of corals that shelter more than 300 species of fish.

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Anglers from across the globe flock to Panama’s oceans for its rewarding big game fishing. Year-round fishing is possible along the Pacific coast, where the bait fish are plentiful. One of the best fishing destinations in Panama is the Pearl Islands, located just one hour from Panama City by speedboat. The lush archipelago, named for the thousands of pearls that were found there by Spanish settlers, has a fascinating mix of marine life. Here opportunities abound to catch Dorado, Yellowfish tuna, Blue and Black Marlin, and Snapper, among many other species.

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Coiba National Park is a protected zone off of Panama’s Pacific Coast, in the Gulf of Chiriquí, consisting of the main Coiba Island, as well as 38 smaller islands and their surrounding waters. In 2005, it was recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its rich flora and fauna and also scientific value, serving home to many threatened species and important to key migration patterns. Coiba Island was once a penal colony, therefore limiting human access or contact, so the result is an extremely pristine destination with nearly intact natural resources.